Inspired by First Light

Joe Cornish Gallery, Northallerton, Spring/Summer 2017

Reynisfjara, Iceland

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Hellnar, Iceland

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Kvaløya, Norway

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Liefdefjorden, Svalbard

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Hvítserkur, Iceland

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I can't remember exactly when I first became aware of the work of Joe Cornish, but it was many years ago and might have been via Lee Filters adverts in photography magazines, which eventually led to me owning a copy of his book First Light. As well as being immediately drawn to the imagery of hills, mountains and the coast that I love, I think the main theme that struck me reading the book back then was the realisation as to the care, craft and patience that can go into image making. Compared at the time to my approach of mostly grab shots as I was out walking, with definitely no tripod nor filters involved. While today I still often take a more spontaneous approach to my photography, one aspect learned from the book which I strive to apply is an understanding and appreciation of the colour and quality of the light, even if most of my photography is not around the golden hour. Revisiting the book I'm also struck as to how many intimate landscapes there are, perhaps partly seeding the idea for me that landscape photography can be about more than the vista.


A Meeting of Minds

Rheged Centre, Cumbria, November 2016

Cave Wood, Wye Valley

The framing and viewpoint, angled down towards the ground, was chosen to give a blank canvas of snow to show off the twiddly bits against.


Light and Land on The Mall

Mall Galleries, London, August 2015

Eigg, Scotland

Kvaløya, Norway

Breiðamerkursandur, Iceland

Torneträsk, Sweden

Kvaløya, Norway

Rùm, Scotland

A self-taught photographer from a technical background with a lifelong interest in the arts and design. Enjoys exploring the wild, remote landscapes of Scotland, Scandinavia and Iceland — as well as the woodlands of the Wye Valley closer to home. Avoids normal landscape photography conventions by taking an unplanned approach to finding images, guided by an instinct for composition and desire to search out unseen details — while attempting the occasional photographic vista. Strives for images that combine simplicity, mystery and beauty — that somehow record a love of being in the mountains or by the sea.


Landscape Photographer of the Year

Waterloo Station, London, December 2014

Lancaut, Wye Valley

Adult Your View
Highly Commended

On a January morning following a cold clear night I knew that conditions were ideal for temperature inversions over the rivers Wye and Severn, so I walked the hour from home to Wynd Cliff just north of Chepstow. At Lancaut the meander in the Wye and surrounding cliffs act as a natural bowl, where cold air collects and mists form. While the viewpoint from which the picture is taken is in Monmouthshire, the view is across the river into Gloucestershire, with the Wye forming the border between England and Wales at this point.


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$Date: 2017-04-14 17:45:57 $